How Hans Scholl received Probst’s leaflet (2nd interrogation)

Question: How did you come to have a copy of the letter that was found on your person – a letter that had already been ripped up? It began with the words “Stalingrad! 200,000 German brothers were sacrificed!”

Answer: When I left my apartment around 10:30 this morning, I found a letter in my mailbox. The envelope was white and it had been addressed by hand: Mr. Hans Scholl, Munich, Franz-Josef Str. 13, Garden House. I briefly skimmed the letter in the foyer of my apartment and then tore it up. I stuck the individual bits of paper in my coat pocket. … Continue reading

Eickemeyer re politics

Hans Scholl definitely was not a disciple of National Socialism. I could see in him clear antagonism to National Socialist ideology, but I never could see that he was thinking about ways to overthrow the National Socialist government or eliminate its leaders. He had a very impassioned manner of speaking and championed decidedly Protestant [religious] views. I never would have believed him capable of treasonous activities punishable by death. Continue reading

Attendees at the Haecker reading

Schmorell Alexander, Graf Willi, Geier [Note 1] from Ulm, Furtmeier from Munich, Christoph Probst, Professor Huber, Falk Harnack, Traute Lafrenz, Karin [sic] Schüddekopf, Jäger [Note 1] [sic] from Munich, Otto Aicher from Ulm, Eickemayr [Note 1][sic], Bäuerle or Feuerle from Ulm (work colleague of Geyer). Continue reading

The Haecker reading

Hans Scholl invited the same circle [Note 1] to a reading by Theodor Haecker. The following persons were there in addition: Traute Lafrenz, Karin [sic] Schüddekopf, Mrs. Dohrn, and two or three other [male] students from Scholl’s [Student] Company; I do not know their names. Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell re Christoph Probst in Munich

I can make the following statement regarding Christoph Probst: Probst and I have been friends for a long time. I myself have known him since we were in school. By chance, he passed through Munich during a trip about 3 weeks ago, and he visited the Scholl siblings in their residence. On that occasion, I spoke to Probst very briefly. … Continue reading

Gisela’s corrections re meeting with Dohrn

Probst’s father-in-law Mr. Dohrn was not in Scholl’s apartment on Franz Joseph Strasse, but rather in Eickemeyer’s studio on Leopold Str. As I recall, I saw him there twice. I had the impression that the meeting had been arranged with Hans Scholl. Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell: Meeting with Harald Dohrn

To the remonstrance that Christoph Probst’s father-in-law Mr. Dohrn was repeatedly at Hans Scholl’s [apartment] while I was there: I can say that I recall that I met Mr. Dohrn twice in Eickemeyer’s studio. Christoph Probst likely introduced him there. During the meeting, I could tell that Mr. Dohrn had the same literary interests as Hans Scholl. It is possible that political matters were discussed on this occasion. Continue reading

Eickemeyer’s observations re political opinions

Question: In your judgment, what were the political viewpoints of Hans Scholl, his sister Sophie Scholl, the artist Wilhelm Geyer, the physiotherapist Harald Dohrn, and the medical students Alexander Schmorell and Willi Graf? Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell re Probst and the White Rose

Around Christmas 1942 [Note 1], I met Probst in Munich and talked with him. Since I know Probst to be a man who likewise has a negative view of National Socialism, and since we are close friends, I told him that Hans Scholl and I were the publishers of the “White Rose” leaflet. I could see that Probst had suspected this for a while and that I was not telling him something he did not already know. Continue reading

Farewell party (Willi Graf)

Question: At the end of July 1942 before you were transferred to Russia, there was a going-away party at the studio of Eickemayer (sic) on Leopold Street. You took part in that party. In addition to yourself, who else took part in this party and what political topics were discussed thereby? Continue reading

Katharina describes ‘farewell party’

In addition, I participated in an event of the extended circle around Scholl. This was shortly before the [male] students went to the front. The meeting was planned as a so-called farewell party. It took place in Eickemeyer’s [Note 1] studio around the middle of July 1942. I believe Miss Lafrenz invited me to this party. Continue reading

Eickemeyer describes the farewell party

Question: What can you say about the farewell party that Hans Scholl held in your studio in the summer of 1942?

Answer: As I already stated yesterday, at that time Scholl (and sometimes his buddies [Note 1] came to my studio to talk about my work and about cultural things. I can also recall that once or twice he brought along women – his sister Sophie Scholl and I believe a student named Lafrenz. Continue reading

Katharina goes to Alex’s soiree

The first time I had contact with the Scholl circle was in Schmorell’s villa. Around the end of June 1942, Lafrenz invited me there for a community reading of the book The Satin Slipper. Continue reading

Katharina describes Mertens’ party

When I am asked whether and at which additional meetings I was present within the Scholl circle, I just remembered that before the meeting at the Schmorell’s villa, I met Lafrenz and Scholl one evening at Prof. Dr. Mertens’ [house]. Therefore I must also correct my previous statement in which I said that I met Lafrenz and Scholl for the first time at Schmorell’s villa. Continue reading

Karl Pötzl comments about Alexander Schmorell

[Karl Pötzl]: I have known Alexander Schmorell since childhood, since he lives very near my parents’ home. We attended the same middle school, but of course we were not in the same grade, since Schmorell is two years older. …

Among Schmorell’s circle of friends, I never met the Scholl siblings. Probst was introduced to me by Alexander Schmorell at a meeting in the winter of 1939 / 40. We spoke only briefly and then said goodbye. Continue reading