List of suspects

[Note 1] Scholl cited the following as motive: Prior to [Note 2] Stalingrad, he was a soldier. There he was able to determine that the German army would never be capable of defeating the Russians. Germany would absolutely lose the war and therefore it was preferable that the war ended before that happened. Every additional day that war was waged meant more unnecessary bloodshed and could not be justified by the leadership. Therefore, students and the intelligentsia should purge the National Socialist system from the people. Continue reading

Search of Eickemeyer’s studio

During the course of the interrogation, the accused Scholls admitted that several objects used in the publication of the leaflets were stored in the basement of the studio of the architect Eichemeier [sic]. …

On February 19, 1943, an immediate search of the location described by the accused Sofie Scholl turned up a set of keys. Following that, the undersigned carried out a search of the studio and all its rooms. In the studio proper, no evidence turned up. The following evidence was found in a corner of the basement, hidden by boxes and other objects. Continue reading

Alex and Willi strategize

Not suspecting a thing, I met him. Schmorell told me that he had learned that two people had been arrested that morning at the university as they were distributing leaflets. He had called the Scholls in their apartment and no one had answered. He therefore had suspected that someone had arrested Scholl and his sister. Continue reading

Schmauβ re Gestapo arrest of Scholls

Schmauβ: The University of Munich’s Chief Privy Councilor Hefner immediately advised the State Police Headquarters in Munich of this incident. They immediately occupied the university building (which had been sealed off in the meantime), together with a large number of municipal police officials. Several hundred leaflets with the inscriptions “Fellow Students!” or “German Students” were seized in the university building. Continue reading

Schmid’s apprehension of Hans and Sophie Scholl

As I made my usual rounds throughout the university buildings today, February 18, 1943 around 11:15 am, and in so doing went down the stairs of the Lichthof [Note 1], I saw that a large amount of paper had been thrown from the Lichthof platform on the third floor [Note 2]. From where I stood, I could not see the place the paper was thrown from. But it was equally impossible for whoever was in the third floor hallway to see me without further ado. Continue reading

Scheidhammer

Statement made by Jakob Schmid on February 18, 1943:

I took them [Note 1] to the property management office. Together with the supervisor, Secr. Scheidhammer, I led the detainees to the legal representative/trustee, RR Hefner, who informed the police. The detectives frisked the students whom I had detained. In so doing, they found several leaflets (folded) in the pockets of the male student. They secured these. In addition, I had observed that the male student had dropped several scraps of paper on the floor, or rather that he tried to drop the paper so it mingled with other papers in the room. Continue reading

Hans Scholl revised story re Schmid

I had hardly finished doing so when I observed that the janitor was trying to follow us up to the third floor [German second floor]. And indeed, my sister and I were only a few meters away from the spot where I had thrown the leaflets before this man came up to us, declared that we were under arrest, and told us to our face that we had just thrown leaflets into the Lichthof. Continue reading