Harder’s second profile


Professor Harder – Munich 22, February 18, 1943
Ludwig Str. 14, 1st staircase

After two leaflets (A and B) were submitted to me yesterday, I received four additional leaflets (Leaflets of the White Rose No. I – IV) today. I will designate these with the letters C – F and once again use line numbers. In addition I have been advised that it has been proven through technical means that the author of A B is identical to the author of C – F. Continue reading

Leaflet mailing 22

The following leaflets were mailed with no record of date of mailing or post office where deposited.

  • To Unknown Persons in Planegg (local branch of municipal government in Planegg, via County Administration). It is unknown which leaflets were mailed to these unknown persons (record 34).
  • Leaflet III to Elisabeth Dane, Private teacher, Munich, Ranke Str. 1/4 (record 13) Continue reading

Leaflet mailing 10

According to the Gestapo, copies of Leaflet II were mailed on July 1 at 09:00 a.m.:

  • To Werner Jacobs, Professor, Munich, Dorotheen Str. 15 – from Post Office 23 (record 12)
  • To Josef Eisenberger, Grocery Store Owner, Zell, township of Ruhpolding, House No. 281/2 – from Post Office 2 (record 33)
  • To Mr. Baer, Member of the Public Health Department, Munich 9, Hochleite – from unknown post office (record 26)
  • To Josef Schneider, Dr. of Veterinary Medicine, Bad Tölz, Bahnhof Str. 13 (Changed by Post Office to “Thanning bei München”) – from Post Office 1 (record 22) Continue reading

Leaflet mailing 02

According to the Gestapo, copies of Leaflet I were mailed on June 27 at 12:00 P.M. from Post Office 1:

  • To Herder Book Store, Munich, Lowengrube 14 (record 3)
  • To Bernd von Heiseler, Brannenburg on the Inn (record 31)
  • To Josef Eisenberger, Grocery Store Owner, Zell, township of Ruhpolding, House No. 281/2 (record 33)

The following was mailed at the same time, but from Post Office 2: Continue reading

Gestapo comments about first leaflet

Yesterday’s expert analysis, page 3, number 4, Christian overtones: … C 38, once again the accusation of godlessness, atheistic war machine. … C 34, member of the Christian and western culture. …

Yesterday’s expert analysis, page 6, 2nd paragraph: I determined that the appeals did not have the tone of an embittered loner. … [As] in B – complains about their indifference ( C 3 ff., D 5 ff.). … Continue reading

Purchase of first duplicating machine

So that we could produce large quantities of the “White Rose” leaflet, I purchased a duplicating machine in [a store on] Sendlinger Str. (I believe it was Baierl Company) in the summer of 1942. I took it to my residence, where we – Scholl and I – together produced about 100 copies. We rather randomly copied out addresses from telephone and other directories and distributed our leaflet by mail. Continue reading

Bischoff’s view of Leaflet I

In addition, the leaflets contain the challenge to exercise passive resistance and to prevent the continuation of the “atheistic” war machine before it is too late and before every last city lies in ruins just like Cologne and before the youth of the nation bleed to death for the “hubris of a subhuman” (White Rose No. 1).


Source: Indictment dated April 8, 1943

The Remington typewriter

As far as I can recall, Schmorell borrowed the portable typewriter (“Remington Portable” [Note 1] brand, serial number unknown) for the first time about 1-1/2 years ago from our family; I do not know who in our family lent it to him. I believe he said he needed it to copy out poetry, because he often said that he wrote poetry. I myself never handed the typewriter over to Schmorell. But my mother or my younger brother always told me when Schmorell had borrowed the typewriter. … Continue reading