Willi Graf stops by to help print leaflets

Before I left [to go skiing], I stopped by Scholl’s apartment around 4 pm, where Hans Scholl or Schmorell were already busy typing the stencil for the leaflet entitled “German Students” or “Fellow Students”. In my presence, Scholl and Schmorell began the production of that leaflet. At first, it was not working properly. And finally, I had to leave because I had to get ready for my trip. Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell re addressing of sixth leaflet

Either the next day, or the day after that, Hans Scholl and I set about getting our leaflets ready to mail. We used an older student directory (I believe Scholl owned something like that) and randomly copied out the addresses of students [Note 1] who lived in Munich. Continue reading

Decision to “scatter” at the university

After I had finished mailing these leaflets and was convinced that my plan had been successful (I sent one to myself and was notified [of delivery] before by at least Schmorell and Graf), I had the idea to distribute the remaining leaflets among the student body or rather at the university. When my sister returned to Munich on Sunday, February 12 14, 1943, I showed her the leaflets I had produced and determined that she was in agreement with their content.

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General note: The dating of this decision is directly linked to Alex Schmorell’s burning of his uniform and paybook, which likely took place on February 11, 1943. More about this once Lilo Ramdohr’s information is uploaded. Additionally, the comment about showing the leaflet to Sophie Scholl on February 14 comes after Hans Scholl’s comment about making the decision to scatter the leaflets at the university.-Ed.

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Source: Hans Scholl’s second interrogation, February 18, 1943 (after 4 a.m.)

Hans Scholl initial story re production of Leaflet 6

Sometime around February 10, our defeat in the East became known. As a result, the mood among the student body worsened. I got the idea to do justice in this situation [Note 1] by publishing a new leaflet. I wrote a draft entitled “Students!” and ran off about 200 copies of it. I did this with the same duplicating machine in my apartment. I was able to do so without my sister’s knowledge, because she was away that week. Continue reading

Gestapo comments about sixth leaflet

Both concoctions demonstrate an extraordinarily high niveau. The speaker is a person who has completely mastered the German language, who has thought through his topic with absolute clarity. The man knows exactly what he wants; he possesses detailed knowledge. He is a German. And indeed, he is not only not an immigrant, he is also a German who has experienced the political events here in this country for many years, up to and including the present time. Continue reading

Huber’s justification for leaflet (Bischoff)

Huber claimed that he only wished to bring about a strong political swing to the right. When he saw that – at a time when there was the greatest concern about the welfare of the nation – a schism had arisen between the student body and the political leadership, he understood that to be a portentous incentive for that step. And in addition, he is an opponent of Bolshevism. Continue reading

Leaflet VI, by Professor Kurt Huber

German Students! [Note 1]

Our nation stands shaken before the demise of the heroes [Note 2] of Stalingrad. The brilliant strategy of a Lance Corporal from the World War has senselessly and irresponsibly driven [Note 3] three hundred thirty thousand German men to death and destruction. Führer, we thank you! Continue reading

Bischoff’s view of Leaflet VI

A short time later, the accused Huber – allegedly induced to do so by the events of a student assembly – decided to go public with a leaflet opposing the National Socialist government. Following a discussion with Scholl, during which Huber evidently presumed to scandalously insult the Führer as he also did during his interrogation on February 27, 1943, the accused Huber wrote a leaflet and gave it to Scholl. Continue reading

Bischoff’s view of Leaflet VI

The leaflet “Students!”, that was later entitled “Fellow Students!” occupied itself with the events in the East and blamed the Führer for that. It primarily directed its call to the student body to force the day of reckoning with the “most abominable tyranny” that our nation has ever endured. It called on the students to crush the National Socialist terror with the power of the spirit.

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Source: Indictment dated April 8, 1943

Hans Scholl initial story re origin of Leaflet 6

Sometime around February 10, our defeat in the East became known. As a result, the mood among the student body worsened. I got the idea to do justice in this situation [Note 1] by publishing a new leaflet. I wrote a draft entitled “Students!”

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Note 1: In the sense of making it right.

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Source: Hans Scholl’s second interrogation, February 18, 1943 (after 4 a.m.)

Alexander Schmorell re Leaflet VI

Following the events in Stalingrad, Scholl and I saw new motivation to produce a leaflet. While Scholl was very depressed about the events in Stalingrad, I (as someone who cared about Russia) was downright [Note 1] happy about the newly created strategic situation for the Russians. Both of us set about writing and distributing the new leaflet [entitled] “Students” [Note 2]. Continue reading