Search of Eickemeyer’s studio

During the course of the interrogation, the accused Scholls admitted that several objects used in the publication of the leaflets were stored in the basement of the studio of the architect Eichemeier [sic]. …

On February 19, 1943, an immediate search of the location described by the accused Sofie Scholl turned up a set of keys. Following that, the undersigned carried out a search of the studio and all its rooms. In the studio proper, no evidence turned up. The following evidence was found in a corner of the basement, hidden by boxes and other objects. Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell re hiding duplicating machine

When we were finished duplicating our leaflets, we took the duplicating machine to the property Leopold Str. 38, studio, cellar, purely out of security considerations. Hans Scholl /added by hand: and/ I carried this out. In so doing, we were in agreement that production of leaflets would be only temporarily suspended and that should the appropriate occasion arise, we would do it again. Continue reading

Gisela becomes suspicious

Otherwise, I cannot think of anyone else who participated in meetings with Hans Scholl. I believe I have already characterized the individual persons insofar as I noticed their political conversation. I must emphasize now as before that during all these meetings, I never thought that this circle could have been working actively against the current regime. Continue reading

Alexander Schmorell re production of fifth leaflet

In contrast to the “White Rose” leaflet, we wrote, duplicated, and distributed the leaflet “Call to All Germans” in Scholl’s residence. In the composition of this leaflet, we were solely concerned about continuing our political revolutionary movement [Note 1], which by its very nature was leveled at the Führer. Continue reading

Social strategy for the fifth leaflet

[Note 1] Due to the scope and relatively large quantity of leaflets that showed up all at once in different places across southern Germany, an uninitiated person would undoubtedly have been of the opinion that this propaganda was being methodically produced by a larger organization. When we mailed the leaflets e.g. in Vienna, Salzburg, Linz, Augsburg, and Stuttgart to local addresses, this was not merely to save money on postage. We also wished to give the impression that there was a local organization that opposed the current regime with this propaganda. We did not ever intend to distract attention away from Munich, that is, the locality where we were working. Continue reading

Willi Graf works on leaflet production

It was only about 8 days later, maybe around January 20, that Hans Scholl told me that I should come to his apartment on a specific afternoon and help him produce leaflets. When I showed up as agreed on the appointed day (January 20 or 21, 1943) at Scholl’s apartment, Scholl’s sister and Schmorell were there too, in addition to Scholl. Continue reading

Hans Scholl initial account of material purchases

Then I borrowed a typewriter, that Alexander Schmorell procured for me. I do not know from whom Schmorell got this typewriter. It was a portable Remington typewriter with a collapsible type-guard. Continue reading