Search of Eickemeyer’s studio

During the course of the interrogation, the accused Scholls admitted that several objects used in the publication of the leaflets were stored in the basement of the studio of the architect Eichemeier [sic]. …

On February 19, 1943, an immediate search of the location described by the accused Sofie Scholl turned up a set of keys. Following that, the undersigned carried out a search of the studio and all its rooms. In the studio proper, no evidence turned up. The following evidence was found in a corner of the basement, hidden by boxes and other objects. Continue reading

Willi Graf stops by to help print leaflets

Before I left [to go skiing], I stopped by Scholl’s apartment around 4 pm, where Hans Scholl or Schmorell were already busy typing the stencil for the leaflet entitled “German Students” or “Fellow Students”. In my presence, Scholl and Schmorell began the production of that leaflet. At first, it was not working properly. And finally, I had to leave because I had to get ready for my trip. Continue reading

Hans Scholl initial story re production of Leaflet 6

Sometime around February 10, our defeat in the East became known. As a result, the mood among the student body worsened. I got the idea to do justice in this situation [Note 1] by publishing a new leaflet. I wrote a draft entitled “Students!” and ran off about 200 copies of it. I did this with the same duplicating machine in my apartment. I was able to do so without my sister’s knowledge, because she was away that week. Continue reading

Social strategy for the fifth leaflet

[Note 1] Due to the scope and relatively large quantity of leaflets that showed up all at once in different places across southern Germany, an uninitiated person would undoubtedly have been of the opinion that this propaganda was being methodically produced by a larger organization. When we mailed the leaflets e.g. in Vienna, Salzburg, Linz, Augsburg, and Stuttgart to local addresses, this was not merely to save money on postage. We also wished to give the impression that there was a local organization that opposed the current regime with this propaganda. We did not ever intend to distract attention away from Munich, that is, the locality where we were working. Continue reading

Willi Graf works on leaflet production

It was only about 8 days later, maybe around January 20, that Hans Scholl told me that I should come to his apartment on a specific afternoon and help him produce leaflets. When I showed up as agreed on the appointed day (January 20 or 21, 1943) at Scholl’s apartment, Scholl’s sister and Schmorell were there too, in addition to Scholl. Continue reading

Stencils and postage stamps

The stencils and absorbent paper that were discovered there after Scholl’s arrest were from our inventory of supplies used to publish our treasonous leaflets. I cannot say for certain whether the stamps that were seized were purchased before my service on the Eastern Front and then kept in my room, or whether they were left over from the mailing of our flyers.


Date is estimate. Placeholder date for purchase of materials for fifth leaflet.


Source: RGWA, February 26, 1943 interrogation of Alexander Schmorell.